Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm is undoubtedly the most atmospheric and photogenic ruin at Angkor, with trees growing out of the ruins. Here you can still experience an India Jones moment and feel like an early explorer. If Angkor Wat and other temples are a testimony to the genius of the ancient Khmers, Ta Prohm equally reminds us of the awesome power of the jungle.

Ta Prohm

Built from 1186, Ta Prohm was a Buddhist temple dedicated to the mother of Jayavarman VII. It is one of the few temples in Angkor where an inscription provides information about the temple’s inhabitants. The temple was home to more than 12,500 people, including 18 high priests, while an additional 80,000 khmers, living in the surrounding villages, were required to maintain the temple. The inscription also notes that the temple contained gold, pearls and silks.

Ta Prohm door

Expansions and additions to Ta Prohm continued until the end of the 13th century. After the fall of the Khmer empire in the 15th century, the temple was abandoned and swallowed up by the jungle. Ta Prohm is the modern name of the temple. Its original name is Rajavihara, meaning “royal temple”.